memberOfRole

Returns issues where the value of a user field is a member of the given role.

For example, to find issues where the Reporter is a member of the Administrators role:


issueFunction in memberOfRole("Reporter", "Administrators")

If you want to find issues where the value may be a member of several roles, you can add multiple role arguments:


issueFunction in memberOfRole("Reporter", "Administrators", "Developers", "Agents")

This is equivalent to using separate clauses joined with OR, but will be more performant.

You can use this function with all User fields, e.g. reporter, creator, assignee, single or multiple user custom fields, and script fields that return users.

You should include a clause that will restrict the number of projects. For example:


project = SUP and issueFunction in memberOfRole('Approvers', 'Service Desk Team')

If you do not include project clauses, there is a possibility that if you have a large number of projects each having a large number of role memberships, the function will fail.

If this is the case, add project clauses like project = SUP or project in (SUPA, SUPB) to restrict the number of projects.

inactiveUsers

Returns users that have been marked Inactive. For example, to find issues that have been assigned to users that have left the organization:


assignee in inactiveUsers()

(This assumes you have a working "leavers" process).

You can use this function with all User fields, e.g. reporter, creator, assignee, single or multiple user custom fields, and script fields that return users.

If you want find issues assigned to active users, you can just invert the query above:


assignee not in inactiveUsers()

jiraUserPropertyEquals


jiraUserPropertyEquals(property name, property value)

This function return users with a matching property value. For example, to find all issues assigned to users in the AMER region:


assignee in jiraUserPropertyEquals("region", "AMER")

This assumes you have set properties on users. This can be done either programmatically, or via the UI at Admin → Users, then click on the user, then Actions → Edit Properties.

So the example from the query above would return this user (and others):

If you set properties programmatically, note that only string properties are supported.

Also, unfortunately, only administrators can view user properties - vote for: JRA-11990.

The intention was originally that one could query users by LDAP attributes, for example office, location or manager etc. However Jira cannot sychronize arbitrary attributes from LDAP, vote for JRA-24332.